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Megan is passionate about litigation. Whether it is advocating for her clients’ interests in negotiations, or appearing on their behalf before Courts and Tribunals, Megan is committed to delivering timely and cost-effective results.

After articling with a prominent plaintiff’s side personal injury firm, Megan has dedicated her practice to insurance defence. She has experience in Statutory Accident Benefits claims, subrogated property claims, quasi-criminal regulatory offences, and a wide variety of bodily injury claims involving motor vehicle accidents, occupiers’ liability, product liability, and municipal liability.

Megan has appeared before the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, the Ontario Court of Justice (Divisional Court), the Ontario Small Claims Court, the Financial Services Commission of Ontario, and the Licence Appeal Tribunal.

When not working, Megan enjoys spending time with animals, travelling, and exploring the city.

WORK EXPERIENCE

Associate, Schultz Frost LLP, Toronto (December 2018- present)

Associate, Kostyniuk & Greenside Lawyers, Toronto (2018)

Associate, Brown & Partners LLP, Toronto (2017-2018)

Student-at-Law, Oatley Vigmond LLP, Barrie (2016-2017)
 
EDUCATION

Year of call: 2017

Juris Doctor J.D., Western University (2016)

Honours Bachelor of Arts B.A (English Literature), Queen’s University (2013)
 
INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS

Ontario Bar Association

Toronto Lawyers Association

Federation of Asian Canadian Lawyers

J.G. v. Aviva, 2019 CanLII 94021 (ON LAT)
2019-07-29
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LAT Hearing resulting in dismissal of claims for IRBs and MR outside of the MIG.
The Duty to Defend Under A Homeowner's Policy for Automobile-Related Incidents
by Megan Cui 2020-06-11
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The Duty to Defend Under A Homeowner’s Policy for Automobile-Related Incidents: SCC Confirms Analysis of Pleadings and Narrow Reading of Exclusions Apply

Adjusters Do Not Have Independent Duty of Good Faith
by Megan Cui 2020-02-14
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Justice Perell, in a recent Superior Court decision on a Rule 21 motion, confirmed that insurance adjusters do not owe a duty of good faith to an insured that is independent of any duty owed by the insurer.  As such, adjusters of insurance companies, when acting strictly in their capacity as employees, cannot be held personally liable for breaching a duty of good faith.  They can only be held liable in tort as individuals if their actions are themselves tortious and exhibit a separate identity or interest from the insurer.